The Best Beer I Ever Had – Vol. 8

Long ago, a young Irishman clued me in on an essential truth. To truly grasp the greatness of Guinness Draught, you must travel to the source. In Ireland, the world-famous stout tastes even better. It’s fresher and creamier – “like an angel pissing on your tonsils,” he said. He meant this in the best possible way.

New York’s Jewish Delis Are Becoming An Endangered Species

When it closes at year’s end, the fabled Carnegie will join a long list of bygone Jewish delis in NYC — a once ubiquitous part of city culture, now struggling for survival in a highly competitive, highly diverse restaurant scene.

NYC Chef of the Year Angie Mar Will Rekindle Your Love Of Meat

In part two of Thrillist’s year-end look at the best of New York City’s food and drink scene in 2016, I sit down with chef Angie Mar, who makes incredible, eye-catching dishes that run counter to the defining trend of the moment, all while undertaking the monumental task of revitalizing a classic.

Cambodian Is The Greatly Underappreciated Outlier In Asian Cooking. This Needs To Change.

As a chef, Jorge Luis Hernandez is familiar with many styles of cuisine, from the Spanish-leaning avant-garde offerings at Minibar in Washington, D.C., where he once worked as executive sous chef, to the Filipino-inspired fare at Qui in Austin, where he currently serves as chef de cuisine. But he never so much as touched Cambodian… Read more »

Ramen 3.0: Two Former Chemists Are Engineering A Noodle Soup Revolution

Jake Freed and his Japanese wife, Hiroko Nakamura, probably aren’t the only entrepreneurs racing to establish the nation’s first Chipotle of Ramen. These days, virtually everyone wants to create the Chipotle of Something. But it’s hard to imagine anyone else taking the same approach. They aren’t chefs or restaurateurs or food-service industrialists of any sort…. Read more »

It’s Cool To Slurp Now

In the old days, your mother would probably scold you for making such horrible noises at suppertime: Slurping your soup was considered poor table manners in polite American society, an egregious faux pas memorably (and quite audibly) sent up in the 1985 crime-comedy Clue. Nowadays, amid the growing influence of Asian food and Asian customs… Read more »

Hip To Be Square: Grandma Pizza Feels Right At Home In New York

Who knew that “grandma” could be so in fashion? I’m referring, of course, to the grandma pizza. Or grandma pie, as it appears on the menu at GG’s in New York City’s East Village. If, that is, you even bother to look. “It’s the one thing that people order as soon as they sit down,… Read more »

The New ‘Cue York: How BBQ Became NYC’s Most Addictive Smoking Habit

Since the opening of Blue Smoke in 2002, New York City has made tremendous strides toward shedding its historical reputation as a barbecue backwater — more than 30 brick-and-mortar restaurants (and counting) are currently dishing up one style of barbecue or another across the five boroughs.  We’re talking about authentic barbecue, mind you, the kind… Read more »

Sir Kensington’s Wins This Round, But The ‘Ketchup Wars’ Are Far From Over

Let’s be upfront: I’m a Heinz devotee, and I’m not shy about it. When I come across menus that advertise some artisanal house-made ketchup instead, I wonder why the chef doesn’t do something more worthwhile with his time, like build a better french fry. As far as I’m concerned, ketchup was perfected long ago, and… Read more »

Montreal Vs. New York: A Matchup That Transcends Hockey. Bagels Involved.

In the lead-up to Thursday’s big game, Food Republic spoke with NHL forward (and doughnut mogul) Jeff Halpern and restaurateur (and die-hard Habs fan) Joel Tietolman to get a better sense of how both food scenes match-up, regardless of the outcome on the ice. Read the full article here.

Latest
  • Remember the Old Tavern On The Green? How Ornate! How Indifferent!

    Long-shuttered Central Park restaurant Tavern On The Green has finally reopened, bringing to mind my last meal there back in 2009, which I wrote about for the Observer: “It reminds me of Mrs. Havisham in Great Expectations, the grande dame who’s seen better days,” my perceptive spouse said, noting the fraying pink tablecloth covering our sloppily… Read more »

  • Meet George Marsh, the Baltimore Butcher Who Rejects the Word ‘Charcuterie’

    In a fancier setting, sliced meats like these — coppa, mortadella, nduja — would merit a fancier menu heading. Amid the candle-lit smug of your average wine-centric corner bistro, this sort of stuff is commonly called “charcuterie” and it typically arrives served on a wood plank with pickles, olives and maybe, if you’re truly lucky,… Read more »

  • Peanuts to Artisanal Peanut Brittle: A Modern History of Baseball Stadium Food

    Mike Isabella is probably not the first rookie in the major leagues to take a swing at chicken parm stardom. But the version that he’s bringing to Nationals Park in Washington, D.C. this spring is a significant upgrade on the typical red-sauced cutlets on a roll, he says. Maybe not a whole different animal, per… Read more »

  • Meet Justin Severino, Pittsburgh’s Sultan of Spiked Salami

    Sherry-spiked saucisson, Fernet Branca–spiked salami, Cynar-spiked swordfish: with so much booze in the food, it’s hard to imagine that Cure, chef Justin Severino’s quasi-quaint charcuterie spot in Pittsburgh, started out just two years ago as a bone-dry BYOB. “We had almost no money,” Severino says of his fashionably rustic-looking restaurant’s humble roots. No, Cure’s chef-owner… Read more »

  • Hot Doug’s Mastermind Doug Sohn On The Only Sausage He Couldn’t Sell

    Doug Sohn, owner of Hot Doug’s, Chicago’s most glorified hot dog stand, has sold all sorts of sausages over the years, from the classic Windy City–style Vienna beef dog to the “Tuben,” his tubular take on a traditional Rueben sandwich. Sohn’s often obscurely titled franks (“The Shirley Hardman,” anyone?) span virtually every type of meat… Read more »

  • This Mezcal Made With Jamón Ibérico Could Make You Squeal

    Leave it to the hams at José Andrés‘ Think Food Group to find a way to add some fancy Spanish pork to just about anything. Consider “Iberico,” the newest label from Del Maguey Single Village Mezcal. The potent 98-proof varietal gets its name and distinctive flavor, of course, from the highly prized black-hooved hogs of… Read more »

  • Green Is The New Gold: The Raw Facts On How Juicing Is Taking Over Our Lives

    Chicago chef Jared Van Camp is perhaps best known for his work with charcuterie. You could say he wears his penchant for pork on his sleeve, with a vintage-looking English butcher’s diagram of pig parts proudly tattooed on his left forearm. Not the type of guy you’d expect to see pushing pints of liquefied kale,… Read more »

  • Tuile of Fortune: Michel Richard Drops a Ritzy Potato Chip Burger on Manhattan

    The recent opening of Villard Michel Richard, tucked inside Manhattan’s Palace Hotel, marked not only its namesake chef’s return to New York after a 40-year absence. It also foisted another gussied-up slab of ground beef onto the city’s escalating up-market burger scene. Behold, the Villard Burger, Richard’s fussy French take on the classic American sandwich…. Read more »

  • It’s Not ‘Myron’s Chicken,’ But Pride & Joy BBQ Moves Forward in NYC

    EAST VILLAGE — A Southern-style barbecue spot is still in the works for the former Lucky Cheng’s space on First Avenue — even after celebrity chef Myron Mixon left the project and sued. Pride and Joy BBQ just won a liquor license to open a sprawling two-level, 220-seat “draft house” and “honky-tonk” featuring three bars… Read more »

  • Here’s How Mezcal Finds You

    Mezcal mogul Ron Cooper sources his small-batch, high-end hooch from remote villages in Mexico. The job takes him over some pretty interesting terrain. On one adventure, the founder of Del Maguey Single Village Mezcal is steering his jeep along some back roads in Oaxaca when he and his crew rumbles into a lush canyon –… Read more »